Italian Word of the Day: Vestaglia (dressing gown)

cover image with the word “vestaglia” and its translation written on a notepad next to a cup of coffee

The Italian word for what we call a dressing gown in English is vestaglia. It derives from the word veste meaning dress, clothing or garment. Vestaglia is a feminine noun, and its plural form is vestaglie. la vestagliathe dressing gown una vestagliaa dressing gown le vestagliethe dressing gowns delle vestaglie(some) dressing gowns Elena si è …

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Italian Word of the Day: Cintura (belt)

cover image with the word “cintura” and its translation written on a notepad next to a cup of coffee

The word for belt, or any kind of material typically worn around the waist, is cintura in Italian. It comes from the Latin cinctura, which in turn is a derivative of the verb cingere (to wrap, tie, enclose). Cintura is a feminine noun, and its plural is cinture. la cinturauna cintura le cinturedelle cinture Six …

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Italian Word of the Day: Mascherina (face mask)

If I had to pick one Italian word to define the year 2020, I would be sorely tempted to go with mascherina (feminine, plural: mascherine) which is the Italian word for a mask that filters air. The diminutive of maschera (the word for any generic mask), it literally translates as little mask. È obbligatorio indossare …

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Italian Word of the Day: Infradito (flip-flops)

Infradito is a type of summer shoe in leather, rubber, straw or plastic, in which the sole is secured to the foot by a strip (called a toe post) that passes between the big toe and the second toe. In English, we’d call these shoes flip-flops, thong sandals or toe-post sandals depending on the style. …

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Italian Word of the Day: Dolcevita (turtleneck)

Dolce vita or la dolce vita is Italian for the sweet life but when combined into a single word, dolcevita, we get the term for the kind of sweater Americans call a turtleneck and the British call a polo neck. What’s interesting is that dolcevita apparently gets its name from the 1960s film by Fellini, …

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Italian Word of the Day: Cappello (hat)

The word for hat or cap in Italian is cappello (masculine, plural: cappelli). It derives from the Latin cappellus which in turn comes from the word cappa meaning hood. When pronouncing this word, it is very important to clearly enunciate the double pp so as to avoid confusion with the similar sounding capello, the Italian …

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