Potere vs Riuscire – What’s the difference?

Knowing when to use the verbs potere and riuscire in Italian can be challenging for a learner, since both translate as can or to be able to in English. To clear up the confusion, let’s take a look at some of the specific circumstances where each verb is used! When to use ‘potere’ in Italian …

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A posto vs Apposto vs Apposta – What’s the difference in Italian?

When words sound similar in a language, it is extremely easy to confuse them, especially if you are a learner of that language! Three terms that learners (and sometimes even native speakers) struggle to distinguish in Italian are a posto, apposto and apposta. In this article, our aim is to explain the difference between them! …

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French vs Italian Language: 5 Similarities & 5 Differences

If you are learning Italian and thinking of studying another language at the same time, one of the easiest you can choose is French. Although they share many similar characteristics due to their shared Latin heritage, there is enough that sets them apart to keep you entertained and challenged. Here are just a handful of …

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Mattino vs Mattina – What’s the difference?

Mattino (masculine) and mattina (feminine), both of which translate as morning in English, are two words of different genders that derive from the same Latin adjective matutinus. They indicate the part of the day between dawn and noon. Their respective plurals are mattini (masculine) and mattine (feminine). Knowing which word to use and when can …

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Solo vs Solamente vs Soltanto: What’s the difference?

In Italian, the words solo, solamente and soltanto all translate as only in English. When used as adverbs and conjunctions, they are completely interchangeable. As an adverb: When used as an adverb, all three correspond to the English adverb only (as in exclusively or merely). For example: Mio figlio mangia solo pane e pasta.Mio figlio …

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