Italian Word of the Day: Carponi (on all fours)

The adverb carponi (also written as a carponi or the less common carpone) is how you would say on all fours or on one’s hands and knees in Italian. It is probably connected with the Latin carpere which means to swipe or to pilfer. Some common verbs you’ll see used with carponi include: camminare carponi …

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Italian Word of the Day: Lentamente (slowly)

In order to say slowly in Italian, all you have to do is take the feminine singular form of the adjective lento (slow) and add on the suffix -mente (which means -ly) to produce the adverb lentamente. Cammino lentamente perché mi fa male la gamba. I’m walking slowly because my leg hurts. An adverb that …

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Italian Word of the Day: Sempre (always / still)

Sempre is an extremely common adverb in Italian that has different meanings depending on the context in which it is used. It comes from the Latin ‘semper’ of the same meaning. Learn with our video 1. Sempre = Always The translation for sempre that most learners encounter first is always. Just like the English word, …

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Italian Word of the Day: Quindi (so / therefore)

An Italian conjunction that allows you to express a conclusion or a cause-and-effect relationship is quindi. It usually translates as so or therefore in English. Both quindi, and its obsolete twin quinci (hence, thus), come from the late Latin eccum inde ‘from here‘. This locative meaning existed in archaic Italian, much like its Latin counterpart, …

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Italian Word of the Day: Magari (maybe / if only)

Recently one of our readers asked us to write an article explaining the different uses for magari in Italian. Given that this is one of our all-time favourite words, we were more than happy to oblige! Learn with our video Magari = maybe / perhaps The translation for magari which learners find easiest to comprehend …

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Italian Word of the Day: Infatti (in fact)

The Italian word infatti is a useful conjunction whose purpose is to confirm, prove or justify a previous statement, much like the English terms in fact, as a matter of fact and indeed. Learn with our video Here is an example that shows how infatti can be used in a sentence. Non mi piace il …

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