Italian Word of the Day: Sedia (chair / seat)

cover image with the word “sedia” and its translation written on a notepad next to a cup of coffee

The Italian word for chair is sedia. It comes from the ancient sieda which in turn derives from the verb sedere (to sit). Sedia is a feminine noun, and the plural is sedie. la sediauna sedia le sediedelle sedie A chair is normally made up of the following parts: schienale = back sedile = seat …

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Italian Word of the Day: Chiave (key)

Chiave is one of those words in Italian with multiple translations, but let’s begin by looking at the most diffused meaning which is key. Chiave is a feminine noun. The plural is chiavi. la chiaveuna chiave le chiavidelle chiavi Two kinds of keys you definitely don’t want to misplace are le chiavi di casa (house …

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Italian Word of the Day: Aspirapolvere (vacuum cleaner)

My son recently turned one, and as young toddlers go, he’s pretty fearless. However, he does have one archenemy: the dreaded aspirapolvere (vacuum cleaner / hoover)! Aspirapolvere is an invariable masculine noun, so it does not change in its plural form. It is composed of the verb aspirare (to suck / to inhale) and polvere …

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Italian Word of the Day: Coperta (blanket)

The Italian word for blanket is coperta (feminine, plural: coperte). It derives from the past participle of the verb coprire (to cover) which is coperto (covered). There are many different kinds of blankets, including: coperta di lana = wool blanket coperta di pile* = fleece blanket coperta di seta = silk blanket coperta di cotone …

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Italian Word of the Day: Doccia (shower)

The word for shower in Italian is doccia (feminine, plural: docce). It derives from the now-obsolete doccio, the term for an archaic kind of gutter or drainpipe. As in English, doccia can refer to the apparatus that produces the spray of water, the cubicle itself, and the act of showering. To take / to have …

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Italian Word of the Day: Water (toilet bowl)

You may be surprised to learn that a word Italians commonly used to denote the toilet bowl is water! It was abbreviated from the dated English term water closet, which is just another name for a typical flush toilet, or more broadly, the small room containing said toilet. Be aware, however, that in Italian the …

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