Italian Word of the Day: Tempo libero (free time)

The opposite of work is free time, which translates quite literally as tempo libero in Italian. Tempo means time and libero means free. The adjective libero ends with an “o” because tempo is a masculine noun. Some examples of hobbies people enjoy in their tempo libero include: cucinare (cooking) giardinaggio (gardening) fotografia (photography) praticare uno …

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Mattino vs Mattina – What’s the difference?

Mattino (masculine) and mattina (feminine), both of which translate as morning in English, are two words of different genders that derive from the same Latin adjective matutinus. They indicate the part of the day between dawn and noon. Their respective plurals are mattini (masculine) and mattine (feminine). Knowing which word to use and when can …

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Italian Phrase: Hai un minuto? (Do you have a minute?)

In both Italian and English, a common way of informally asking to have a quick word with someone is: Hai un minuto? Do you have a minute? Learn with our video and podcast The video is also available on our YouTube channel. The podcast episode can be found on Podbean, Apple Podcast and Spotify. Keep …

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Italian Word of the Day: Oggi (today)

The word for today in Italian is oggi. It derives from the Latin hŏdie which itself is a contraction of hoc die (on this day). Ieri mi hai detto che l’incontro si sarebbe tenuto oggi, ma in realtà ho scoperto che si svolge domani! Yesterday you told me the meeting would be held today but …

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Italian Word of the Day: Gennaio (January)

January, or gennaio in Italian, is the month that marks the beginning of the new year. Despite the days being short and the weather cold, it is a wonderful time to visit Northern Italy if you enjoy skiing and hiking in the mountains. Gennaio is the first month (primo mese) of the year according to …

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Italian Word of the Day: Fine (end)

What better way to bid farewell to what has been a rather trying 2020 than by talking about the word for end in Italian, which is fine (feminine, plural: fini). Both this word and the English word finish can be traced back to the Latin finis of the same meaning. As in English, fine can …

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