The 20 Most Important Italian Verbs Ending in -ERE

Italian verbs can be divided into three families, called “conjugations”, based on the ending of the infinitive. Verbs ending in -are belong to the first conjugation, those in -ere to the second conjugation and those in -ire to the third conjugation. Avere (“to have”) and essere (“to be”) are the only exceptions since they belong …

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Italian Word of the Day: Rendersi conto (to realise)

cover image with the words “rendersi conto” and a young girl realising something in the background

If you want to say “to realise” in Italian, it is possible to use the cognate realizzare, but if your aim is to sound like a true native, why not try dropping the odd “rendersi conto” into your exchanges as well? Rendersi conto is made up of: the verb rendere which means to render or …

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Italian Word of the Day: Ululare (to howl / to wail)

The verb ululare (and its English cognate to ululate) descends from the Latin verb ululare, meaning to howl or to wail. The Latin root carried the same meaning as the modern Italian word, and almost certainly originated from the howling sound associated with it. Ululare is a regular -are verb, so it can be conjugated …

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Italian Word of the Day: Sbucciare (to peel)

cover image with the word “sbucciare” and its translation written on a notepad next to a cup of coffee

The verb sbucciare means to peel, to shell, or to husk in Italian. In other words, it denotes the action of removing the skin from a fruit, vegetable or nut. Sbucciare is composed of the s- prefix, which in this case denotes the absence or loss of some quality or attribute that is normally present, …

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Italian Word of the Day: Scervellarsi (to rack one’s brains)

cover image with the word “scervellarsi” and its translation written on a notepad next to a cup of coffee

Have you ever found yourself racking your brains trying to find the answer to a problem? Then today’s verb is for you! Scervellarsi (to rack one’s brains) is made up of the noun cervello (brain) and the prefix s- which in this case denotes the absence or loss of something. About the pronunciationThe combination of …

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Italian Word of the Day: Pendolare (commuter)

cover image with the word “pendolare” and its translation written on a notepad next to a cup of coffee

Pendolare is an interesting Italian word in that it can be classified as a noun, verb or adjective. Let’s begin by looking at its usage as a verb, as doing so will help us understand the meaning behind the noun and adjective. Pendolare is a regular -are verb that means to oscillate, to swing, or …

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