Italian Word of the Day: Gironzolare (to wander / to hang around)

Today we’re going to be taking a look at the verb gironzolare, which describes the act of walking or moving around a place without any particular aim. Some possible English translations include to wander, to hang around or to loiter. As you might have guessed, gironzolare derives from the verb girare which means to turn …

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Italian Word of the Day: Gattonare (to crawl / to stalk)

The verb gattonare in Italian has two meanings, depending on whether you are describing a human being or an animal. When a human, or more specifically a baby, is the subject, gattonare means to crawl. Mia figlia ha cominciato a gattonare molto presto. My daughter started crawling very early. When talking about predatory animals such …

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Italian Word of the Day: Russare (to snore)

Has your other half’s snoring been keeping you up all night? Then maybe now’s a good time to learn the Italian verb russare! Derived from the term hrūzzan, it is one of many words that entered Italian via the Lombard language of Northern Italy. Learn with our video Since it is a regular -are verb, …

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The 20 Most Common Italian Verbs Ending in -ARE

Italian verbs can be divided into three groups, classified according to the ending of their infinitive forms: -are, -ere and -ire. Today we’re going to take a closer look at the -are group, otherwise known as the “first conjugation”. In order to conjugate verbs in the -are group, all you have to do is remove …

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Italian Word of the Day: A prescindere da (regardless / apart from)

Today we have an expression that, if used correctly, can go a long way in helping you sound like a fluent Italian speaker! A prescindere da is used to indicate something you purposely do not take into account, leave out of consideration, or put to one side. The expression comes from the verb prescindere which …

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