Italian Word of the Day: Per sempre (forever)

What has become predominantly a single word in English (forever) is actually two words in Italian: the preposition per (for) + sempre (always / still / increasingly). Below are a few common verbs you’ll see used with per sempre: durare per sempre = to last forever vivere per sempre = to live forever tacere per …

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Italian Word of the Day: Domani (tomorrow)

The Italian word domani (tomorrow in English) comes from the Latin de mane whose rough translation is starting from the morning. Domani can be paired with different words that denote the time of day: domani mattina (or domattina) = tomorrow morning domani pomeriggio = tomorrow afternoon domani sera = tomorrow evening domani notte = tomorrow …

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Italian Word of the Day: C’è / Ci sono (there is / there are)

When talking about the existence or presence of something in English, we use the expressions there is / there’s (singular) and there are (plural). In Italian, the exact equivalents are c’è (singular) and ci sono (plural). C’è is the contracted form of ci + è. Learn with this video: c’è / ci sono In informal …

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Italian Word of the Day: Molto (much / many / very)

One of the first words that will enter your survival vocabulary in Italy is molto (plural: molti | feminine: molta | plural feminine: molte). It can mean either much or many depending on whether you are referring to uncountable nouns (such as electricity, water or happiness) or countable nouns (such as apples, dogs or cars). …

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How to Say “Yes” in Italian – Sì

To say yes in Italian, you use two letters and an accent: sì. As in English, it is used both as an interjection and a way to express a positive answer. The grave accent above the i is very important. Without the accent, si becomes a noun or a pronoun. (You can read more about …

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