Italian Word of the Day: Nero (black)

The word for the darkest colour in existence owing to the complete absence or absorption of light is nero in Italian, or black in English. Its form changes to nera when modifying feminine nouns, and their respective plurals are neri and nere. Un vestito nero means a black suit, whereas a person who is vestito …

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Italian Word of the Day: Tempo (weather)

The Italian word for weather is tempo (masculine, plural: tempi). It comes from the Latin tempus meaning time – and yes, before you say anything, we are fully aware that tempo is also the word for time in Italian. However, we won’t be covering this definition here, as it deserves a blog post all of …

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Italian Word of the Day: Minestra (soup)

On a cold wintery day, few things are more comforting than curling up with a bowl of hot minestra (feminine, plural: minestre). Minestra is just one way of saying soup in Italian, and it has a fascinating history as we’ll discover in this article! Learn with our video Although minestra is now a generic term …

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Italian Word of the Day: Anziano (old / elderly)

In Italian, there are two possible ways to translate the word old: vecchio: this adjective can refer to people who have lived or things that have been around for a long time; it can also mean old as in ‘long-established’ (e.g. an old friend = un vecchio amico) anziano: this adjective refers to people who …

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The Meaning of “Mamma mia!” in Italian (Oh my goodness!)

The Swedish band Abba may have made the expression popular around the world, but Italians have been using Mamma mia! as a mild expression of surprise, joy, annoyance, disappointment, anger and fear for years. It can translate in numerous ways in English including Oh my goodness! Wow! and Oh man! to name a few. Learn …

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