Italian Word of the Day: Sedia (chair / seat)

cover image with the word “sedia” and its translation written on a notepad next to a cup of coffee

The Italian word for chair is sedia. It comes from the ancient sieda which in turn derives from the verb sedere (to sit). Sedia is a feminine noun, and the plural is sedie. la sediauna sedia le sediedelle sedie A chair is normally made up of the following parts: schienale = back sedile = seat …

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Italian Word of the Day: Chiave (key)

Chiave is one of those words in Italian with multiple translations, but let’s begin by looking at the most diffused meaning which is key. Chiave is a feminine noun. The plural is chiavi. la chiaveuna chiave le chiavidelle chiavi Two kinds of keys you definitely don’t want to misplace are le chiavi di casa (house …

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Italian Word of the Day: Matto (crazy)

Matto is one of many ways you can translate the word crazy into Italian. It is thought to come from the late Latin mattus, which means drunk, and later assumed the meaning of stupid before acquiring its current definition. Because matto is an adjective, the masculine singular ending –o changes to –a for the feminine …

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Italian Word of the Day: Ciliegia (cherry)

The word for cherry in Italian is ciliegia (feminine). According to Treccani, the proper plural form is ciliegie, but up until the middle of the last century, the spelling ciliege was also fairly widespread. It comes from the Latin ceresia, which in turn derives from the Greek κερασος. The word for cherry tree is formed …

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Italian Word of the Day: Doccia (shower)

The word for shower in Italian is doccia (feminine, plural: docce). It derives from the now-obsolete doccio, the term for an archaic kind of gutter or drainpipe. As in English, doccia can refer to the apparatus that produces the spray of water, the cubicle itself, and the act of showering. To take / to have …

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