Italian Word of the Day: Nero (black)

The word for the darkest colour in existence owing to the complete absence or absorption of light is nero in Italian, or black in English. Its form changes to nera when modifying feminine nouns, and their respective plurals are neri and nere. Un vestito nero means a black suit, whereas a person who is vestito …

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Italian Word of the Day: Viola (purple / violet)

The colour purple is known as viola in Italian. It comes from the Latin word of the same spelling. When used as an adjective, it remains invariable, or in other words, it has the same form in both the singular and the plural. For example: un vestito viola = a purple dress (masculine, singular) una …

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Italian Word of the Day: Giallo (yellow)

One of the seven colours that sits between arancione (orange) and verde (green) on the spectrum is giallo (yellow). It is also one of the three primary colours along with rosso (red) and blu (blue). It comes from the Latin word galbĭnus which means greenish-yellow or yellowish. Il giallo era il mio colore preferito quando …

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Italian Word of the Day: Rosa (rose)

The prickly shrub that bears red, pink, yellow or white flowers is called a rosa (feminine, plural: rose) in Italian. It is also the name given to the colour pink, presumably because many roses come in a pink shade. Questa rosa mi sembra più rosa che rossa. This rose looks more pink than red to …

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Italian Word of the Day: Colore (colour)

The Italian word for colour, or color if you live in the States, is colore (masculine, plural: colori), both of which come from the Latin color. The seven most commonly cited and remembered colours of the rainbow (colori dell’arcobaleno), as defined by Issac Newton, are as follows: rosso (red) arancione (orange) giallo (yellow) verde (green) …

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