How to Say “Well done, Italy!” in Italian – “Bravi Azzurri!”

This Sunday, July 11th, Italy will face England in the UEFA EURO 2020 final, which will be played at Wembley Stadium in London. From what we’ve seen so far, it promises to be an exhilarating game between two well-matched teams!

UEFA Euro 2020 logo

Whether Italy comes out victorious or not, you may wish to know how to congratulate the team on a game well-played in the Italian language. Whereas in English, we tend to say Well done!, Italians tend to use the catch-all term Bravo! in the world of sports.

But before you go using bravo, it’s important to keep in mind that everything in Italian must agree in gender and number. This means that bravo must become the masculine plural bravi when directed toward Gli Azzurri (lit. the Light Blues), which is the name of the Italian team.

Bravi Azzurri! Siete arrivati in finale!

Well done, Italy! You made it to the finals!


italian supporters wearing blue shirts, cheering with their hands in the air

Italian fans also refer to the team simply as ragazzi, which means guys, boys or young men, rather than its official name.

Bravi ragazzi! Ce l’avete fatta!

Well done, guys! You did it!


If you are referring to individual male players, however, you have to use the masculine singular bravo.

Bravo Federico! Che bel gol!

Well done, Federico! What a great goal!


soccer ball on grassy football pitch at stadium

Sometimes Italians use the exclamation Grande! instead of Bravo! which is an informal way of saying Awesome! Great job! or Good for you! Once again, if it is being used to describe Gli Azzurri or ragazzi, both of which are masculine plural nouns, you need to put it into its plural form grandi.

Grandi Azzurri! Siamo in finale!

Great job, Italy! We’re in the finals!


Grandi ragazzi! Avete giocato molto bene!

Great job, guys! You played really well!


Did you know that…?
The men’s national soccer team tend to get all the attention, but did you know that Italy has a female team as well? It goes by the name of Le Azzurre, which is the feminine equivalent of Gli Azzurri.

A more formal way to give someone a verbal pat on the back is by using the word complimenti (congratulations). For example:

  • Complimenti ragazzi! = Congratulations guys!
  • Complimenti alla squadra italiana! = Congratulations to the Italian team!
  • Complimenti Italia / all’Italia! = Congratulations Italy / to Italy!

However, when cheering on a team, it is more appropriate to use bravi or grandi.

cover image with the phrase “Bravi Azzurri!” and its translation written on a notepad