Italian Word of the Day: Tortuoso (windy / winding)

cover image with the word “tortuoso” and a windy road in the background

If you are familiar with the word tortuous in English, you should have no trouble remembering its Italian equivalent tortuoso, which usually translates as windy or winding in everyday English. Adjectives such as tortuoso always agree with the noun they describe, which means that they have to demonstrate whether they are masculine or feminine and …

Read more

Italian Word of the Day: Spigliato (self-confident)

A person who is uninhibited, confident and sure of themselves can be called spigliato in Italian. It is the past participle of the verb spigliare, meaning “to make (someone) more relaxed and confident”. Because it is an adjective, the form changes depending on the gender and plurality of the noun in question: spigliato = masculine, …

Read more

Italian Word of the Day: Sgargiante (gaudy / showy)

cover image with the word “sgargiante” and flashy boots in the background

Today we’ll be focusing on an advanced Italian adjective that translates in many ways including gaudy, showy, flamboyant, glitzy and flashy: sgargiante. It is thought to derive from the present participle of the Neapolitan sgargià meaning ‘to look (at someone) with a loving gaze’ with the intention of attracting their attention. When modifying masculine and …

Read more

Italian Word of the Day: Allettante (tempting / attractive)

cover image with the word “allettante” and its translation written on a notepad next to a cup of coffee

Allettante is an adjective in Italian that means tempting, attractive or inviting. It derives from the verb allettare (to entice, to attract), which in turn comes from the Latin allectare. When it modifies masculine and feminine singular nouns, the form remains the same, or in other words, the -e ending doesn’t change. For example: un …

Read more

Italian Word of the Day: Freddo (cold)

cover image with the word “freddo” and its translation written on a notepad next to a cup of coffee

One of the very first Italian adjectives you should learn as a beginner is freddo, which means cold. ‘Freddo’ as an adjective As with all adjectives, the ending changes in accordance with the gender and/or number of the subject in question. freddo = masculine, singular fredda = feminine, singular freddi = masculine, plural fredde = …

Read more

Italian Word of the Day: Limpido (clear / limpid)

cover image with the word “limpido” and its translation written on a notepad next to a cup of coffee

If you are already familiar with the English adjective limpid, you should have no trouble whatsoever memorising the word limpido in Italian. It comes from the Latin limpidus of the same meaning. Limpido is an adjective and its ending changes depending on the gender and/or plurality. un diamante limpido (masc. sing.) = a clear diamond …

Read more