Italian Word of the Day: Broncio (pout / sulky expression)

cover image with the word “broncio” and its translation written on a notepad next to a cup of coffee

Broncio is an evocative noun in Italian that means pout or sulky expression. The exact origin of broncio remains somewhat contested. Treccani suggests that it may come from the late Latin brunchus meaning ‘snout’ or ‘face’, whereas Devoto-Oli states that it derives from the ancient French bronchier (meaning ‘vacillate’) which in turn comes from bronche …

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Italian Word of the Day: Pendolare (commuter)

cover image with the word “pendolare” and its translation written on a notepad next to a cup of coffee

Pendolare is an interesting Italian word in that it can be classified as a noun, verb or adjective. Let’s begin by looking at its usage as a verb, as doing so will help us understand the meaning behind the noun and adjective. Pendolare is a regular -are verb that means to oscillate, to swing, or …

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Italian Word of the Day: Perdente (loser / losing)

cover image with the word “perdente” and its translation written on a notepad next to a cup of coffee

In every aspect of life, there are inevitably winners and losers. The word for the former is vincitore, whereas the latter is our word of the day: perdente. Perdente is a noun that can be either masculine or feminine. The plural form for both genders is perdenti with an -i on the end. The only …

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Italian Word of the Day: Mobile (mobile / piece of furniture)

cover image with the word “mobile” and its translation written on a notepad next to a cup of coffee

Mobile is a word with various meanings in Italian but perhaps not everybody knows that one of the most common is furniture. Mobile is a masculine noun and its singular form means a single piece of furniture whereas the plural mobili generally refers to furniture as a whole. That said, the singular is also used …

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Italian Word of the Day: Matto (crazy)

Matto is one of many ways you can translate the word crazy into Italian. It is thought to come from the late Latin mattus, which means drunk, and later assumed the meaning of stupid before acquiring its current definition. Because matto is an adjective, the masculine singular ending –o changes to –a for the feminine …

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Italian Word of the Day: Emozionato (excited / moved / nervous)

Emozionato is one of those adjectives in Italian whose translation varies depending on the context in which it is used. However, in every case, it denotes a state of emotional upheaval, be it positive or negative. Used in a positive sense, it can translate as either excited or moved. For example: Luigi è molto emozionato …

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