Italian Word of the Day: Nero (black)

The word for the darkest colour in existence owing to the complete absence or absorption of light is nero in Italian, or black in English. Its form changes to nera when modifying feminine nouns, and their respective plurals are neri and nere. Un vestito nero means a black suit, whereas a person who is vestito …

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Italian Word of the Day: Malato (sick / ill)

One of the most common adjectives in Italian for someone who is sick or ill is malato. The feminine form is malata and their respective plurals are malati and malate. Just like its English equivalent, it can describe ailing plants and animals too. If you are only suffering from a minor sickness, you can say …

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Italian Word of the Day: Anziano (old / elderly)

In Italian, there are two possible ways to translate the word old: vecchio: this adjective can refer to people who have lived or things that have been around for a long time; it can also mean old as in ‘long-established’ (e.g. an old friend = un vecchio amico) anziano: this adjective refers to people who …

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Italian Word of the Day: Permaloso (touchy / sensitive)

It seems that my young son’s personality is forever changing. At six months, he was an adventurous and confident baby. But then, just a week shy of turning ten months old, he suddenly became extremely clingy and permaloso, crying at the strangest things, from crinkling paper to the sound of me sweeping up his post-dinner …

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Italian Word of the Day: Allucinante (shocking / amazing)

Today’s word of the day is the adjective allucinante (plural: allucinanti). Literally, allucinante means hallucinatory but more often than not, you will see it used figuratively to describe a fact or event that causes such astonishment, shock or terror that it would appear to be the product of a hallucination. Some possible translations in English …

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