Italian Word of the Day: Grinta (grit / determination / scowl)

cover image with the word “grinta” and a boxer in the background

A person with a lot of courage and resolve can be described using the noun grinta in Italian. The closest equivalents are grit or determination in English, although other translations such as fighting spirit and drive may also work depending on the context. Unlike the vast majority of words in Italian, grinta derives, not from …

Read more

Italian Word of the Day: Strafalcione (big mistake / clanger)

cover image with the word “strafalcione” and a woman worried in the background

Have you ever made a mistake so big that it has continued to haunt you over the years? Then strafalcione is the word for you! Because strafalcione is a masculine noun starting with the consonants st-, it takes the following definite and indefinite articles: lo strafalcionethe big mistakeuno strafalcionea big mistake gli strafalcionithe big mistakesdegli …

Read more

Italian Word of the Day: Oltremodo (extremely / exceedingly)

cover image with the word “oltremodo” and a woman struggling with work in the background

Today we’re going to be taking a look at the advanced adverb oltremodo which means extremely or exceedingly. It is the combination of the words oltre (beyond, over) and modo (way), and can be written as two separate words. Oltremodo normally appears after verbs and before adjectives and nouns. For example: annoiarsi oltremodo (verb + …

Read more

Italian Word of the Day: Rendersi conto (to realise)

cover image with the words “rendersi conto” and a young girl realising something in the background

If you want to say “to realise” in Italian, it is possible to use the cognate realizzare, but if your aim is to sound like a true native, why not try dropping the odd “rendersi conto” into your exchanges as well? Rendersi conto is made up of: the verb rendere which means to render or …

Read more

Italian Word of the Day: Capatina (quick visit)

cover image with the word “capatina” and a two people talking in the background

The word capatina in Italian means a quick or flying visit. It is the diminutive form of capata (capata + -ina), which means exactly the same thing but, for some reason, isn’t used with the same frequency as capatina. Because it is a feminine noun, capatina takes the following definite and indefinite articles: la capatinauna …

Read more

Italian Word of the Day: Fiuto (sense of smell / instinct)

cover image with the word “fiuto” and a dog sniffing in the background

Today’s word of the day is fiuto, which comes from the verb fiutare meaning to to smell / to sniff. Fiuto is a masculine noun, so it takes the following definite and indefinite articles. il fiutoun fiuto i fiutidei fiuti Fiuto is most frequently used to talk about an animal’s sense of smell, or even …

Read more