Italian Word of the Day: In quanto (as / since)

cover image with the words “in quanto” and its translation written on a notepad next to a cup of coffee

In quanto is a commonly used conjunctive phrase in Italian that translates in numerous ways, including since, as, and because. Non lo chiamo più in quanto non risponde mai al telefono. I don’t call him anymore as he never answers the phone. Less frequently it is followed by che (that) with no change in meaning. …

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Italian Word of the Day: Carponi (on all fours)

The adverb carponi (also written as a carponi or the less common carpone) is how you would say on all fours or on one’s hands and knees in Italian. It is probably connected with the Latin carpere which means to swipe or to pilfer. Some common verbs you’ll see used with carponi include: camminare carponi …

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Italian Word of the Day: Accanito (relentless / obstinate)

If you can imagine a dog sinking its teeth into your favourite pair of shoes and refusing to let go no matter how hard you pull, you are already halfway to understanding the meaning of the adjective accanito! Accanito itself derives from the word for dog in Italian, which is cane. It is used to …

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Italian Word of the Day: A bruciapelo (point-blank)

The word bruciapelo (masculine, invariable) is mostly seen in the expression a bruciapelo which literally means point-blank or at point-blank range. It is formed of two words: the verb bruciare (to burn) and the noun pelo (a single body hair). The idea is that if a gun is shot at very close range, it can …

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Italian Word of the Day: Fruscio (rustle / rustling)

The word fruscio (masculine) in Italian is a noun that usually describes the following kinds of subdued sounds: robes swishing flowing water of a stream or river leaves rustling in the wind feet walking along the ground snakes rustling in the grass In most cases, it equates in meaning to the words rustle or rustling …

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