Italian Word of the Day: Crepacuore (heartbreak)

Crepacuore (masculine, plural: crepacuori) is one possible translation for heartbreak or broken heart in Italian. It is made up of two terms: the verb crepare, which is a colloquial way of saying to die, and cuore, the word for heart. Below are a couple of verbs you might hear used with this word: morire di …

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Italian Word of the Day: Visto che (given that / since)

Today we will be talking about visto che, a very useful Italian conjunction that can be translated in numerous ways, including: since given that seeing that considering that because in view of the fact that Visto che introduces a causal clause (a clause that expresses the reason of the main clause) with the verb in …

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Italian Word of the Day: A prescindere da (regardless / apart from)

Today we have an expression that, if used correctly, can go a long way in helping you sound like a fluent Italian speaker! A prescindere da is used to indicate something you purposely do not take into account, leave out of consideration, or put to one side. The expression comes from the verb prescindere which …

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Italian Word of the Day: Barlume (flicker / glimmer)

What I consider a rather romantic-sounding term in Italian is barlume (masculine, plural: barlumi) which is the word for any kind of dim light, such as a glimmer, flicker or gleam. It derives from the word lume (one possible translation for light in Italian) and the prefix bar- which is akin to the pejorative prefix …

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Italian Word of the Day: Scavezzacollo (daredevil)

The word for a reckless young person who leads a wild, free and unruly life is scavezzacollo in Italian. Three possible translations in English include daredevil, risk-taker and tearaway. Learn with our video It is composed of two words: scavezzare, a single verb that means to break the top off a tree or more generally …

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