Italian Phrase of the Week: Non mi va! (I don’t feel like it!)

Whenever you don’t feel up to doing something, perhaps due to tiredness or simply because you aren’t in the mood, you can use the phrase Non mi va! which roughly translates as I don’t feel like it! / I don’t fancy it! / It doesn’t sit well with me! in English. This expression is made …

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Italian Word of the Day: Abbiocco (drowsiness)

We’ve all experienced it — that drowsy sensation that sneaks up on you after a large meal. One minute you’re chatting and laughing with friends and family, and the next, you’re slumped back on the couch, struggling to keep your eyes open. Italians have a special word for the fit of drowsiness that occurs after …

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How to Say “Christmas Eve” in Italian – Vigilia di Natale

Today’s word of the day is part of our Italian Christmas Word Advent Calendar series. Each day throughout December, we’ll post a word that is related to the holiday season. Enjoy! The word for eve in Italian is vigilia (feminine, plural vigilie) and Christmas Eve is known as la vigilia di Natale. Alla vigilia di Natale, gli …

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Italian Word of the Day: Mangiatoia (manger)

Today’s word of the day is part of our Italian Christmas Word Advent Calendar series. Each day throughout December, we’ll post a word that is related to the holiday season. Enjoy! The word for manger in Italian is mangiatoia (feminine, plural: mangiatoie). It is made up of two parts: mangiare (to eat) + the instrumental suffix -toia …

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Italian Word of the Day: Presepe (nativity scene)

Today’s word of the day is part of our Italian Christmas Word Advent Calendar series. Each day throughout December, we’ll post a word that is related to the holiday season. Enjoy! The presepe (masculine, plural: presepi), or nativity scene in English, has been an integral part of the Italian Christmas tradition since the 16th century. …

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Italian Phrase of the Week: Mi raccomando!

Mi raccomando is one of those wonderfully Italian phrases that cannot easily be translated into English because there isn’t an exact equivalent. It comes from the verb raccomandare which translates to recommend or to entrust but by making it reflexive (raccomandarsi) it becomes to plead with, to beg or to implore. Mi sono raccomandato tanto …

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