Italian Word of the Day: Coccinella (ladybug / ladybird)

cover image with the word “coccinella” and a ladybug in the background

Coccinella is the word for ladybug (US) or ladybird (UK) in Italian. It derives from the Latin coccinus, which in turn comes from the Greek kókkinos, meaning ‘scarlet red colour’. It is a feminine noun whose plural form is coccinelle. The definite and indefinite articles it takes are as follows: la coccinellathe ladybuguna coccinellaa ladybug …

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Italian Word of the Day: Serpente (snake)

cover image with the word “serpente” and a snake in the background

The Italian word serpente (snake) should be very easy to remember for English speakers, as it sounds and looks just like the synonym serpent. Serpente is a masculine noun whose plural form is serpenti. It takes the following definite and indefinite articles: il serpentethe snakeun serpentea snake i serpentithe snakesdei serpenti(some) snakes Here are a …

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Italian Word of the Day: Aquila (eagle)

cover image with the word “aquila” and an eagle in the background

The Italian word for eagle is aquila. Both the Italian and English terms share the same origin, which is the Latin aquila. Because aquila is a feminine noun that starts with a vowel, it takes the following definite and indefinite articles: l’aquilathe eagleun’aquilaan eagle le aquilethe eaglesdelle aquile(some) eagles Two of the most well-known eagles …

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Italian Word of the Day: Gabbiano (seagull)

cover image with the word “gabbiano” and its translation written on a notepad next to a cup of coffee

I spent most of my early life living in big cities, but for the past seven years, I’ve had the immense privilege of being able to live by the mare (sea). There is nothing quite like breathing in the fresh salty air and falling asleep to the sound of the waves and the gabbiani (seagulls)! …

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Italian Word of the Day: Calabrone (hornet)

cover image with the word “calabrone” and its translation written on a notepad next to a cup of coffee

I’ve been stung by many api (bees) and vespe (wasps) in my lifetime, but I thank my lucky stars that I’ve never been on the receiving end of a calabrone sting! The word calabrone comes from the Latin crabronem of the same meaning. Calabrone is a masculine noun. The plural is calabroni. un calabroneil calabrone …

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Italian Word of the Day: Lucertola (lizard)

Although the words lizard and lucertola share the same Latin origin – the word lacertus which meant lizard, sea fish or muscle – I think many of you would agree that the Italian has a much prettier ring to it! Lucertola is a feminine singular noun that becomes lucertole in its plural form. la lucertolauna …

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