Italian Word of the Day: Bizza (tantrum / scene)

You might already know the very common word capriccio, but did you know there’s another Italian word for a tantrum or scene? That word is bizza! bizza tantrum / scene Bizza is a feminine noun that takes the following definite and indefinite articles: While capriccio is more generic, bizza tends to indicate a brief and …

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Italian Word of the Day: Magro (thin / slim / light / scarce)

Some adjectives in Italian have only one straightforward meaning, while others encompass a range broader than you might anticipate. Magro is one such adjective! magro thin / light / scarce Since magro is an adjective, its ending changes based on the gender and number of the subject – magro (masculine, singular), magra (feminine, singular), magri …

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Italian Word of the Day: Occhiata (glance / quick look)

Occhiata, which is the combination of the word occhio (eye) with the noun-forming suffix -ata, may not be the most profound word in Italian but it is used very frequently in everyday conversation. occhiata glance / quick look It translates to glance, glimpse, quick look or peek depending on the context, and as you’ve probably …

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Italian Word of the Day: Bagnato (wet)

Today’s word of the day, bagnato (wet), is inspired by the dreadful weather we’ve been experiencing here in Wales. We’ve barely seen a couple of weeks of sunshine in nearly nine months! bagnato wet Bagnato is an adjective that is also the past participle of the verb bagnare (to wet / to water). Bagnare, in …

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Italian Word of the Day: Scimmia (monkey)

The monkey, known as scimmia in Italian, is one of the closest relatives to gli essere umani (human beings). In fact, we share over 90% of our DNA with our primate cousins! scimmia monkey The word is derived from the Latin simia, which in turn comes from simus, derived from the Greek simós meaning ‘”snub-nosed.” …

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Italian Word of the Day: Putiferio (commotion / rumpus)

Some Italian words lend themselves to exploration, and putiferio is one such gem. It’s the perfect term for describing a commotion, uproar, or rumpus in Italian. putiferio commotion / uproar / rumpus This word, according to the Devoto-Oli dictionary, is a deformation of the word vituperio, meaning bitter or abusive language. It is derived from …

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