Italian Word of the Day: Mammone (mama’s boy)

cover image with the word “mammone” and its translation written on a notepad next to a cup of coffee

For the first year of my son’s life, he had a fairly strong preference for his father, constantly wanting to be held by him and searching for him when he wasn’t around. Now that he’s a little older, he has become much more of a mammone, which is the word for a mama’s boy (or …

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Italian Word of the Day: Tacchino (turkey)

cover image with the word “tacchino” and its translation written on a notepad next to a cup of coffee

This coming Thursday is Thanksgiving (Festa del Ringraziamento) in the United States, and since many of our readers are Italian Americans, we decided to dedicate today’s word to the humble centrepiece of the Thanksgiving dinner table: the tacchino (turkey). Tacchino is a masculine noun ending in -o, making its plural form tacchini. Note that the …

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Italian Word of the Day: Finocchio (fennel)

cover image with the word “finocchio” and its translation written on a notepad next to a cup of coffee

Before moving to Italy, I was completely unfamiliar with the finocchio, an aromatic yellow-flowered plant of the parsley family with feathery leaves and gentle aniseed flavour. It has since become one of my favourite winter vegetables! Finocchio is a masculine noun, and the plural is finocchi. un finocchioil finocchio dei finocchii finocchi There are many …

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Italian Word of the Day: Torcicollo (crick in the neck)

cover image with the word “torcicollo” and its translation written on a notepad next to a cup of coffee

In Italy, you’ll often hear people use the single word torcicollo to describe a crick in one’s neck or a stiff neck caused by an injury. It is made up of two words: the verb torcere meaning to twist or to contort, and collo meaning neck. Torcicollo is a masculine noun. The plural is torcicolli. …

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Italian Word of the Day: Cintura (belt)

cover image with the word “cintura” and its translation written on a notepad next to a cup of coffee

The word for belt, or any kind of material typically worn around the waist, is cintura in Italian. It comes from the Latin cinctura, which in turn is a derivative of the verb cingere (to wrap, tie, enclose). Cintura is a feminine noun, and its plural is cinture. la cinturauna cintura le cinturedelle cinture Six …

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