Italian Word of the Day: Lavoro (work / job)

cover image with the word “lavoro” and a man working in the background

A word that consistently makes it onto the list of the top 100 most common words in Italian is lavoro. It derives from the verb lavorare (to work), which in turn comes from the Latin ‘laborare’ (to toil). Because it is a masculine noun, lavoro takes the following definite and indefinite articles: il lavoroun lavoro …

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Italian Word of the Day: Divano (couch / sofa)

cover image with the word “divano” and a a young girl sitting on the couch and listening to music in the background

Today’s word of the day is an indispensable piece of furniture found in most homes: the humble divano (couch, sofa, settee). It is a masculine noun, so it takes the following definite and indefinite articles: il divanothe couchun divanoa couch i divanithe couchesdei divani(some) couches Alice si sta rilassando sul divano, sorseggiando una tazza di …

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Italian Word of the Day: Oltremodo (extremely / exceedingly)

cover image with the word “oltremodo” and a woman struggling with work in the background

Today we’re going to be taking a look at the advanced adverb oltremodo which means extremely or exceedingly. It is the combination of the words oltre (beyond, over) and modo (way), and can be written as two separate words. Oltremodo normally appears after verbs and before adjectives and nouns. For example: annoiarsi oltremodo (verb + …

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Italian Word of the Day: Serpente (snake)

cover image with the word “serpente” and a snake in the background

The Italian word serpente (snake) should be very easy to remember for English speakers, as it sounds and looks just like the synonym serpent. Serpente is a masculine noun whose plural form is serpenti. It takes the following definite and indefinite articles: il serpentethe snakeun serpentea snake i serpentithe snakesdei serpenti(some) snakes Here are a …

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Italian Word of the Day: Spilla (brooch / pin)

cover image with the word “spilla” and a brooch in the background

The word for an ornament that one fastens to clothing, either for decorative purposes or as a clasp, is spilla in Italian. It translates as either brooch or pin in English. Being a feminine noun, it takes the following definite and indefinite articles: la spillathe broochuna spillaa brooch le spillethe broochesdelle spille(some) brooches Some different …

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Italian Word of the Day: Rendersi conto (to realise)

cover image with the words “rendersi conto” and a young girl realising something in the background

If you want to say “to realise” in Italian, it is possible to use the cognate realizzare, but if your aim is to sound like a true native, why not try dropping the odd “rendersi conto” into your exchanges as well? Rendersi conto is made up of: the verb rendere which means to render or …

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