Italian Word of the Day: Capatina (quick visit)

cover image with the word “capatina” and a two people talking in the background

The word capatina in Italian means a quick or flying visit. It is the diminutive form of capata (capata + -ina), which means exactly the same thing but, for some reason, isn’t used with the same frequency as capatina. Because it is a feminine noun, capatina takes the following definite and indefinite articles: la capatinauna …

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Italian Word of the Day: Sasso (stone / rock)

cover image with the word “sasso” and a various stones in the background

The Italian term sasso is fairly comprehensive in that it can be used to denote anything rock-like, from the smallest pebbles and stones to rocks, boulders, and even larger masses. In fact, it can even refer to rock faces and mountains, especially in toponyms such as Gran Sasso d’Italia, a massif in the Apennine Mountains …

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Italian Word of the Day: Bancomat (ATM / bank card)

cover image with the word “bancomat” and a ATM machine in the background

Bancomat is the commercial name of the electronic system that allows bank customers to make withdrawals and purchases, and perform other accounting operations from ATMs. However, in everyday speech, you will commonly hear it used to denote both: the magnetic bank card that gives access to the service (also known as carta bancomat or tessera …

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Italian Word of the Day: Tortuoso (windy / winding)

cover image with the word “tortuoso” and a windy road in the background

If you are familiar with the word tortuous in English, you should have no trouble remembering its Italian equivalent tortuoso, which usually translates as windy or winding in everyday English. Adjectives such as tortuoso always agree with the noun they describe, which means that they have to demonstrate whether they are masculine or feminine and …

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Italian Word of the Day: Mento (chin)

cover image with the word “mento” and a woman holding her chin in the background

The word for chin in Italian is mento. It derives from the Latin mentum of the same meaning. Being a masculine noun, mento takes the following definite and indefinite articles: il mentothe chinun mentoa chin i mentithe chinsdei menti(some) chins Mi sono svegliato con un brufolo enorme sul mento! I woke up with a huge …

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Italian Word of the Day: Fiuto (sense of smell / instinct)

cover image with the word “fiuto” and a dog sniffing in the background

Today’s word of the day is fiuto, which comes from the verb fiutare meaning to to smell / to sniff. Fiuto is a masculine noun, so it takes the following definite and indefinite articles. il fiutoun fiuto i fiutidei fiuti Fiuto is most frequently used to talk about an animal’s sense of smell, or even …

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