Italian Word of the Day: Antipasto (appetizer)

Italian meals are made up of several courses, the first being the antipasto, or appetizer / starter in English. Antipasti is a mix of light food brought before the primo (first main course) whose main purpose is to stimulate your appetite. It is composed of two words: anti and pasto with the latter meaning meal. …

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Italian Word of the Day: Divertirsi (to have fun)

In Italian, there is a single reflexive verb that can be used to express the concept “to have fun” and that is divertirsi. What is a reflexive verb, you ask? Well, it is any verb whose direct object is the same as its subject. In Italian, these verbs always end in si, with some good …

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Italian Word for “Family” – Famiglia

Like many other nations, the family plays a central role in Italian culture. The further south you go, the more sacred the concept of family becomes. Famiglia is the translation of family in Italian. It is a feminine noun that takes the following definite and indefinite articles: la famiglia una famiglia le famigliedelle famiglie The …

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Italian Word of the Day: Molto (much / many / very)

One of the first words that will enter your survival vocabulary in Italy is molto (plural: molti | feminine: molta | plural feminine: molte). It can mean either much or many depending on whether you are referring to uncountable nouns (such as electricity, water or happiness) or countable nouns (such as apples, dogs or cars). …

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How to Say “Crazy” in Italian – Pazzo

A few months ago, I was coerced into watching the film Free Solo at the cinema and despite being on the edge of my seat the entire time, I have to say I’m glad I plucked up the courage to go! This gripping documentary tells the tale of Alex Honnold and his groundbreaking free solo …

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How to Say “We” in Italian – Noi

When conjugating a verb in a sentence, the first-person plural, we, translates to noi in Italian. Noi abitiamo in Inghilterra. We live in England. In Italian, the person can often be omitted from the sentence because unlike English, the conjugated verb changes for each person, so it becomes obvious what the subject is. For example, …

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